London emphasizes on Ultra-Low Emission Zone in the proposal to curb air pollution

London emphasizes on Ultra-Low Emission Zone in the proposal to curb air pollution

Highlights:

  • The new ULEZ is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, except on Christmas Day.
  • The growth occurs at a time when major economies are attempting to reduce the environmental impact of road-based transportation.

Launch of London’s ULEZ

On Monday, London’s Ultra-Low Emission Zone was expanded, with the mayor of the United Kingdom’s capital applauding the move as “a historic day for our city.” The new ULEZ, which covers a fifth of London and 3.8 million people, is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, except on Christmas Day.

Under the ULEZ:

  • Vehicles that fail to meet specific emissions limits will be fined £12.50 ($17.20) every day.
  • The penalty for non-compliance is £160, but if paid within 14 days, it can be lowered to £80.
  • The ULEZ is linked to central London’s Congestion Charge zone, which costs £15 per day. This zone is not being expanded at the moment.

Previous remarkable success by ULEZ

In April of this year, the first ULEZ was introduced. According to Transport for London, it has contributed to a 44 percent reduction “in roadside nitrogen dioxide inside its borders.”

The bulk of heavy vehicles in the city are subject to a Low Emission Zone. Authorities claim that the LEZ covers “much of Greater London.”

In reaction to the ULEZ’s expansion, London Mayor Sadiq Khan claimed, “The ULEZ has already helped reduce harmful roadside nitrogen dioxide pollution by nearly half in central London.” This resulted in reductions that were five times greater than the national average.

“However, pollution isn’t just a problem in London’s downtown,” Khan pointed out. “As a result, today’s ULEZ expansion will benefit Londoners across the city. It is also a key step in the city’s green recovery from this pandemic,” added the mayor.

Tackling with the heavy pollution areas

“While this is a huge step forward, we must not become complacent in the face of this unseen threat,” she said in a joint statement with Khan.

She went on to remark that the majority of Londoners “still live in areas with disturbingly high pollution levels.”

“As a result, we eagerly anticipate working with the Mayor.” This will help us ensure that the ULEZ and other pollution-reduction measures go further and be completed more swiftly to enhance the air quality in and around the city.”

On a global basis, air pollution is a big problem. The World Health Organization estimates that “exposure to ambient (outdoor) air pollution” kills 4.2 million people per year.

Low-emission zones are being put in place at a time when major economies are attempting to reduce the environmental effect of road-based transportation.

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